Lance Armstrong Admits To Using Performance-Enhancing Drugs

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(Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

(Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

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Lance Armstrong admitted that he cheated during most of his cycling career and if anyone dared to tell the truth about it, Armstrong said he would bully them. After denying doping allegations for over a decade, Armstrong finally admitted to using the performance enhancing drugs in his seven Tour de France wins. The drugs Armstrong used are erythropoietin (EPO), testosterone, cortisone and human growth hormone. He also used “blood doping” and blood transfusions. Armstrong also admitted that he did not believe it would be possible for him to win all those titles without doping. So here is the question, why is he now finally admitting to all of this? Well, Lance really didn’t have the best answer for that. Instead, he said, “that’s the best question. It’s the most logical question…I don’t know that I have a great answer. I will start my answer by saying that this is too late.  It’s too late for probably most people, and that’s my fault.  I viewed this situation as one big lie that I repeated a lot of times, and as you said, it wasn’t as if I just said no and I moved off it.” Admitting that he started to take drugs in the mid-1990s, Armstrong claimed he did it for the last time in 2005 which means that he was clean during his comeback when he competed in the Tour de France in 2009 and 2012 and didn’t win either of them.

When asked if he believed he was cheating, Armstrong said no. He said, “I went and looked up the definition of cheat and the definition is to gain an advantage on a rival or foe.  I didn’t view it that way.  I viewed it as a level playing field. I don’t think… I didn’t have access to anything else that nobody else did.” But, the one thing that Armstrong admitted to was that he ruined a lot of people who tried to rat him out when it came to his doping over the years and Lance said he’s trying to make amends and apologize. He said, “when I say that there are people that will hear this and will never forgive me, I understand that.  I do.  I have started that process.  I think all of this is a process for me. One of the steps of that process is to speak to those people directly, and just say to them that I am sorry, and I was wrong.  You were right.”

One person he has already spoken to personally is Betsy Andreu, the wife of Armstrong’s former teammate Frankie Andreu and even though Betsy isn’t quite ready to forgive him yet, she did believe that he didn’t mean to call her a nasty name. Lastly, Armstrong said  “I disrespected the rules… that was my choice.  But if we can, and I stand on no moral platform here, certainly not my place to say, ‘Hey, guys, let’s clean up cycling.’ [But] if there was a truth and reconciliation commission . . . again, I can’t call for that.  I’ve got no cred . . . If they have it, and I’m invited, I’ll be the first man at the door.”

To read the complete transcript click here and to watch clips from the interview, click here.

Part two of this interview airs tonight on OWN.

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